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Black History Month

 

PVCC Celebrates Black History Month. Please join us for these virtual events:

Quiz on Africa - Yesterday and Today

Quiz on Africa - Yesterday and Today

Presentation Recording Available

Popular Nigerian Foods and Cuisines

Popular Nigerian Foods and Cuisines

Presentation Recording Available

Black History Month Panel

Black History Month Alumni Panel

Presentation Recording Available

Amanda Gorman - Poet
22-Year-Old Amanda Gorman Makes History

Amanda Gorman made history on Wednesday, January 20, 2021, when she became the youngest poet to read at a presidential inauguration.

Learn More

This article provides the transcript of the poem read by Amanda Gorman.

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August Wilson - Black History Month
Dorothy Height - Black History Month
Henry Garnet - Black History Month
What does Black History Month Mean to New AJS Interim Program Director?

Mr. Vincent Watkins, who was recently appointed Interim Administration of Justice Studies Program Director, shares what Black History Month means to him in this video introduction for PVCC and the community.

Read more about Mr. Watkins

Support Black-owned Local Businesses
Support Black-owned Local Businesses

Greater Phoenix is home to several Black-owned businesses bringing generations of culture and character to our neighborhoods. We encourage you to celebrate and patronize these businesses that deliver a spirited touch of Black heritage.

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James Forten - Black History Month
Lauren Anderson - Black History Month
Marsha P. Johnson - Black History Month
Tops Reads from Buxton Library - Black History Month
Tops Reads from Buxton Library - Black History Month

1) The Prophets by Robert Jones Jr.
A singular and stunning debut novel about the forbidden union between two enslaved young men on a Deep South plantation, the refuge they find in each other, and a betrayal that threatens their existence.

2) Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson
The Pulitzer Prize–winning, bestselling author of The Warmth of Other Suns examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions.

3) The Burden: African Americans and the Enduring Impact of Slavery edited by Rochelle Riley
This collection of essays is a plea to America to understand what life post-slavery remains like for many African Americans, who are descended from people whose unpaid labor built this land, but have had to spend the last century and a half carrying the dual burden of fighting racial injustice and rising above the lowered expectations and hateful bigotry that attempt to keep them shackled to that past. 

4) The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander
It has spent nearly 250 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. Most important of all, it has spawned a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexander's unforgettable argument that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it." As the Birmingham News proclaimed, it is "undoubtedly the most important book published in this century about the U.S."

5) Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems by Lucille Clifton
The poems are personal, but the distant thunder of history rumbles behind every line. As she says on seeing a photograph: "is it the cut glass/ of their eyes/ looking up toward/ the new gnarled branch/ of the black man/ hanging from a tree?" Clifton's work hearkens back to the days of the Black Arts Movement and sheds light on the new black aesthetic. These are economical slices of ordinary life, celebrations, if you will, of African American existence. With simple language and common sense, she writes of grace, character, and race by way of the personal and familiar.

Matthew Henson - Black History Month
Mariya Russell - Black History Month
Dr. Rebecca Lee Crumpler - Black History Month
Black History Month - Featuring Scholarship Opportunities
Black History Month - Featuring Scholarship Opportunities

Throughout history, many minority groups, including African-American and Black students, have not been afforded equal educational opportunities. However, there are an abundance of scholarship opportunities minority students can tap into with a little discipline and drive. Doing your homework will open the doors to a range of scholarships varying from general small rewards to full-rides for both undergraduate and graduate students. Many rewards target specific programs like nursing and business, and there are always gender-specific funds available as well.

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Southern Collard Greens
Southern Collard Greens

Recipe from Jocelyn Goodwin, RN, MSN PVCC Nursing Faculty

This Collard Greens Recipe uses a Pressure Cooker.

Ingredients

2 lbs. clean and shredded (roll leaf and cut) collards. (rinse and spin dry)
4lbs smoked turkey necks or turkey leg
¼ lb. diced thick sliced bacon
1 small onion diced
Garlic (about two cloves)
2 cups of chicken broth
2 middle sized jalapeno peppers

Shredded Collard Greens

Steps

  1. Brown bacon in pressure cooker on sauté.
  2. Add onions and stir before bacon has completely browned.
  3. Add garlic and stir.
  4. Turn off cooker so you will not burn bacon, onion, and garlic mixture.
  5. Remove the stem that is in the center of the leaf before washing and cutting greens.
  6. Add chicken broth to the pressure cooker.
  7. Add ½ of greens and place turkey on top of the greens. Add peppers.
  8. Add the second half of collards and liberally sprinkle “Slap Ya Mama” seasoning.
  9. Turn pressure cooker on high, lock the top and let greens cook for 30 minutes. Total time is about 50 minutes because the pressure cooker must build up pressure and “pop” the top/valve (about ten minutes).
  10. Carefully open, place a clean kitchen towel over the top to “catch” the steam, so that you will not get burned from the safety valve.
  11. Stir the greens if there are any bones from the turkey necks, remove them.
  12. Remove jalapenos or dice cooked peppers and stir.
  13. Enjoy the collards. Tastes great with cornbread and they are a great side dish for many meals.

I like coarse ground black pepper or red pepper flakes and garlic. I add to my taste before I close the top.

Black History Month
In Case You Missed This

Popular Nigerian Foods and Cuisines
Feb 3, 2021 01:54 PM
Presentation Recording Available

Quiz on Africa - Yesterday and Today
Feb 12, 2021 10:00 AM
Presentation Recording Available

Black History Month Alumni Panel
Feb 16, 2021 10:00 AM
Presentation Recording Available